KPB Blog

College Coaches Want to Know How You Lose (2018)

There is always a lot of great baseball during the college playoffs. Last year’s playoffs included great plays, gritty pitching, and thrilling walk-offs. Of course, for all the exciting games in the Regionals and Super Regionals (and even the College World Series), there are still losing teams. For many players, the loss meant the end of their season. Sometimes the scores were close; sometimes they were lopsided. A loss is never easy, no matter what the scoreboard says. Baseball is a heartless game. One day you’re on top and the next, you’re facing a crushing shutout.  

While you might think that coaches and recruiters are only interested in players who win games, they will sometimes make decisions based on how well you handle losing or failure. Why? Because every ballplayer faces loss; it’s part of the game. Coaches these days are looking for players with “character.” They are looking for players who will add strength, not problems, to their teams. Here are a few tips to help you get noticed, even after you’ve lost an important game.  

  1. It is ok to show emotions. Coaches don’t expect you to be a robot. You might be feeling frustrated, disappointed, sad, and even angry. Coaches want to see that it matters to you, but that you can manage those emotions. That means you should never throw equipment, knock things over, hit anything, lash out, or lose control of yourself. 
  2. Show that you respect your teammates, other players, coaches and officials. If you blame your teammates, refuse to shake hands with the other team, complain about the umpires, sulk, or walk away from your coach, you are going to get crossed off recruiters’ lists. Don’t forget, recruiters and coaches often share information. You could lose your chance to play at the next level if you get a reputation that you are immature or a troublemaker. 
  3. Show that you respect yourself. Keep your head up. Look everyone in the eye. Don’t say anything negative about yourself. Stay calm and if it is appropriate, start thinking about what you could have done differently. If you made mistakes, take responsibility but recognize that mistakes happen and they don’t change who you are. Show your coach and your teammates that you are walking away from the loss and turning the page, taking only the lessons that will help you improve in the future. 
  4. Be a leader. You’re a competitor. You need to compete until the last out in the last inning, no matter what the scoreboard says. But, once the game is over, you need to accept the loss. A leader takes adversity in stride and when he does, his team takes notice. You can help your team by keeping things in perspective and positive. You need to show your teammates (and recruiters) that you are the kind of player who picks up his friends, stays calm and considerate, and walks off the field even stronger than when the game began.